Rain Water Re-use

drenotube® is an inexpensive and effective option to infiltrate water into the soil.

drenotube® drainage system is designed to offer maximum protection against flooding caused by substantial amounts of rain falling rapidly on developments whose surfaces are built from impermeable materials such as concrete, tiles, etc. Infiltration of stormwater back into the ground is a fundamental method of preserving water resources and, if possible, should be utilised on all development sites.

By collecting surface water and redistributing it into the subsoil, drenotube® also offers a sustainable solution for management of stormwater run-off.

drenotube® protects water resources in places that have areas that do not allow infiltration of water into the soil. These areas include roads, buildings, roofs, decks, patios, driveways, parking areas, compacted soils, walkways and other similar hard surfaces on the landscape. drenotube® drainfields allows water storage until it can be percolated back into the soil, helping to restore groundwater.

 

How can water resources be protected?

Water moves through a cycle powered by evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation and infiltration. drenotube® takes steps towards preventing problems, spending less money managing infrastructures and increasing protection of natural resources.

Natural lands carry out the critical functions of allowing water to infiltrate into the ground and filtering contaminants from stormwater runoff.

Implementing effective stormwater management requires good information gathering, education, planning, policy-making and practice.

As landscapes change from natural conditions (fields and forests) to highly built conditions (buildings, roads, parking lots), water quality and quantity are adversely affected. As water quality and quantity degrades, community vulnerability increases.

 

Reduced infiltration and filtration in the built environment

In built areas, infiltration of water from rainwater and snowmelt is limited. The majority of precipitation moves across the land surface as runoff. The impemeable cover (roads, roofs, parking lots) that accompanies development diminishes both infiltration of water into the ground and filtration of pollutants through soils. The bottom line is that managing stormwater in built areas is necessary to prevent flooding, reduce erosion, water pollution, and to protect public safety.

Impervious cover is considered one of the biggest challenges to water resource protection because of its effect on the quantity, distribution and quality of water and its association with urbanization. Impervious cover or impervious surfaces refers to areas that do not allow infiltration of water into the soil. These surfaces include roads, buildings, roofs, decks, patios, driveways, parking areas, compacted soils, walkways and other similar hard surfaces on the landscape. Impervious cover interferes with processes that would naturally occur in undeveloped landscapes, namely the infiltration of water into the ground and filtration of water by plants and soil. Impervious cover contributes to water quality and quantity problems by accelerating the accumulation, flow and contamination of water over the landscape on its way downhill to receiving waters. In heavy storms, large volumes of stormwater flow over impervious areas, accumulate quickly and dump into local storm drains, streams and rivers. They erode shorelines, scour stream banks and stream beds and cause property damage. Impervious cover accelerates both the volume and the rate of flow of stormwater. Impervious cover also stops groundwater systems from refilling, thereby lowering water tables and diminishing base stream flow and aquifer supplies.

Impervious cover does not only present challenges for clean and adequate water, but also for communities, who are responsible for protecting water quality and quantity.

Conventional stormwater management depends on impervious covers to convey stormwater away from built sites, typically across pavement to a gutter or drain and into a municipal pipe system that delivers the stormwater to a local water body.

 

 

    

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